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ACOG SMI & NYSDOH NYSPQC Webinar: Managing COVID-19+ Pregnant Patients - Shared screen with speaker view
Kristen Lawless
15:19
Please chat in questions or comments for our panelists To Everyone.
Kristin DeVries
34:00
As mentioned earlier, please chat in your questions to everyone for our webinar faculty.
Corey Greene
38:14
Message From Erum Azhar:would it be more benefits of passive antibodies to newborn if pregnant women are vaccinated in 3rd trimester ?
whitney hall
38:49
What about the pregnant patient who is exposed or positive for covid after the first vaccine but before the second? What are our recommendations?
Caitlyn Baron
41:03
I unfortunately got COVID at 26 weeks pregnant. I am now 28 weeks... do you still recommend I receive the vaccine?
loralei thornburg
41:45
For exposure between the two doses: The CDC is currently recommending that people continue their schedule even if exposed between the doses.
Kristin DeVries
48:57
Here is the link to the latest - 3/25 - guidance on support persons in labor & delivery: https://coronavirus.health.ny.gov/system/files/documents/2021/03/hospital-visitation-3-25-2021.pdf
Shannon Berhman
52:16
For L&D admit and patient previously COVID+ within past 90 days are you just requiring they provide proof of date of COVID+?
Iffath Hoskins
54:01
are there any guidelines re: should the 2 accompanying persons only stay on L&D, or can they go outside (eg get lunch, etc). What about Post Partum, can 2 persons also be there or does one of the 2 persons have to eave after the delivery. What about the guideline sfor antepartum patients who may stay awhile
Camille Clare (she/her/hers)
55:18
we tend to have the support persons remain with patients on labor and delivery and an individual approach for antepartum patients admitted to the hospital
Kristin DeVries
56:30
Re: support person discussion, here is the actual language from the latest DOH advisory: In addition, hospitals will ensure that following allowances are made:• Labor and Deliveryo Two support persons, including a doula if requested, may accompany the patientthroughout labor, delivery, and the postpartum period, including recovery, until dischargeto home. The support persons can be the patient’s spouse, partner, sibling, parent, orother persons of their choice.
Dena Goffman
56:31
This is the wording in the newer document...In addition, hospitals will ensure that following allowances are made:• Labor and Deliveryo Twosupportpersons,includingadoulaifrequested,mayaccompanythepatient throughout labor, delivery, and the postpartum period, including recovery, until discharge to home. The support persons can be the patient’s spouse, partner, sibling, parent, or other persons of their choice.
Kathleen Dermady
59:35
Is this document from the NYSDOH ?Can you include reference or link ?
Dena Goffman
59:57
https://coronavirus.health.ny.gov/system/files/documents/2021/03/hospital-visitation-3-25-2021.pdf
Alexandria Horner
01:01:03
Will we be getting a handout of the slides?
Christa Christakis
01:01:14
yes
Kristin DeVries
01:01:54
The slides & a recording of this webinar will be sent out via listserv to attendees.
Chika Iwuchukwu
01:05:25
thanks for that recording
Laurie Nolan-Kelley
01:05:40
What would your recommendation be for women in their late third trimester that are questioning whether to wait just a few more weeks until after delivery to get vaccinated? Is there any data on whether it's preferable to be vaccinated in the last weeks of pregnancy versus immediately postpartum?
loralei thornburg
01:07:00
There are not data on pregnancy vs. postpartum, however, there is some early data that passive immunity through transplacental antibody cross, as well as in the breastmilk, so that vaccination in pregnancy may be beneficial.
Dena Goffman
01:07:16
We don’t have data to address late pregnancy vs postpartum. Up until recently we were in an interesting dilemma where persons were vaccine eligible in pregnancy but not postpartum. This is now shifting. Again I think it would be a risk benefit discussion with the particular patient’s context.
Camille Clare (she/her/hers)
01:07:43
it is addressing the why that people are hesitant which is been helpful to the discussion
Chika Iwuchukwu
01:08:01
historical reasons also
Danielle Gadbois
01:09:11
How would you address fear of potential longer term effects?
Corey Greene
01:10:00
Message from Erum Azhar:case report of “Newborn Antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 detected in cord blood after maternal vaccination” shows passive antibodies when mom vaccinated
Erum Azhar
01:10:02
case report of “Newborn Antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 detected in cord blood after maternal vaccination” show passive antibodies when mom is avccinated
Laurie Nolan-Kelley
01:10:22
I believe the context is a belief that the risks to the baby would be lesser for a woman vaccinated during lactation as opposed to during pregnancy - if the antibody benefits are present in both scenarios
Dena Goffman
01:10:53
I think we have to be transparent that we don’t have long term data. However, the long term implications of COVID infection are becoming clearer and clearer. We also need to think about biologic plausibility for long term effects of these vaccines.
whitney hall
01:11:47
Isn’t it true that the hesitancy exists more with white republican males? Do we have the data of BIPOC hesitancy?
Dena Goffman
01:11:58
We need to remember that not all women will breastfeed…that’s why it is a conversation with the patient
Loraine O'Neill
01:14:23
Excellent--many thanks
Kathleen Dermady
01:14:26
Thank you